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Nakita Remembers The Good Old Days

  • Publisher Ted
  • Date published
In the last episode of The Adventures of Bongo and Nakita that aired in the original series run, Nakita reminisces about her days running an unused car dealership.

TV-Y7: MV

About this episode

After the fourth episode, the showrunner Nick Phillips seemed to suffer from writer's block. Thus he falls back on what he at the time considered foolproof comedy: car accidents.

The fifth episode "These Things Happen" begins with a clip show of earlier moments in the season, and later scenes borrow heavily from situations already presented earlier, with some child abuse thrown in. It injects a full scene from another series Bongomon, implying that The Adventures of Bongo and Nakita is set in the same universe. And it concludes with another sample 3D Movie Maker project called "Sprog: The Film Star."

"These Things Happen" suffered from reverting from the narrative style of more recent episodes to the more experimental approach of the early season. That, combined with extended memory sequences that were easily confused with present day sequences, led to a story that was difficult to follow and for audiences to engage with. Nick Phillips started writing a final episode, but the original series run was cancelled before it could be completed.

A notable moment in this episode occurs when it pokes fun at an established filmmaking element: the scene transition. In one scene, the driver of a vehicle becomes aware of a transition in progress, causing them to crash.

For the re-release, some small changes have been made to the episode to improve audio audibility, text legibility, and to correct timing issues. In addition, color saturation in memory sequences has been reduced to make the story easier for audiences to follow. After consultation with Nick Phillips, the "Sprog" sequence has been dramatically cut down to improve pacing and narrative throughline. The original ending credits sequence has been replaced to be consistent with earlier remastered episodes.

Nakita Has a Visit From the School Board

  • Publisher Ted
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Nakita has been a bit strict with the students at her preschool, and rumor has it that the school board has taken notice.

TV-MA: AL, SC, MV
Seizure warning! This program contains flashing lights.

About this episode

Nick Phillips continued The Adventures of Bongo and Nakita with "Crisis" in fall 2001, and explores the question that's been on everyone's minds since episode 1: Will Bongo and Nakita ever get together?!

"Crisis" features more adult themes than previous installments, covering such topics as unemployment and language barriers. In the latter half, called "The Trip to Mexico," Bongo discovers he can't do anything on his vacation because he doesn't know Spanish. Nick Phillips wrote and voiced this segment while he was studying Spanish in his free time, using it to practice and improve his own ability in the language.

In the episode, Bongo gets a gig as an actor on a movie called "Venus 31." The entire Venus 31 sequence is copied from a sample project that was provided with the 3D Movie Maker program.

The episode includes a commercial break, which advertises the T.J.'s Cracked Egg Studios movie Skelly, a remake of Skelly 2, from which the episode also includes a reenacted scene during its end credits. Interestingly, "Crisis" credits cast and crew involved with the making of the Skelly clip even though it was played as a commercial.

Some small changes have been made to the episode to improve audio audibility, text legibility, and to correct timing issues. The original ending credits sequence has been replaced to be consistent with earlier remastered episodes and to spare viewers the agony of sitting through the extremely slowly rolling original credits.

TH: Finally Re-released After Thirty Years!

  • Publisher Ted
  • Date published
Thirty years ago today, October 30, 1992, Teddy Phillips was in the hospital undergoing chemotherapy, when he gave a live performance to patients and staff, of a story-book animation production he called Th (pronounced ð, as in "this").

Th was considered to be completely lost and faded into myth. For many years, it was a subject of much debate among studio archivists and fans who were not there to see it, over its place in studio history. But beginning in 2008, some behind-the-scenes photographs were discovered. And in 2022, additional photographic evidence and analysis led to Th reclaiming its title as Teddy's first movie.

Recent analysis gave archivists a high degree of confidence that photographs of all cels had been found, enabling Cracked Egg Studios to finally release this video adaptation of Th for its 30th anniversary.

From a cultural perspective, Th is also notable for being shot in portrait mode 15 years before cell phone video made it popular to do so.

TV-MA: GV

Nakita Survives in Episode #3

  • Publisher Ted
  • Date published
After the Earth exploded, Nakita survived. Now she goes in search of air.

In protest of The Simpsons "Treehouse of Horror" segments not being considered canon in their series, the third episode of The Adventures of Bongo and Nakita continues where "Halloween I" left off.

TV-G: AC, AL, MV
Seizure warning! This program contains flashing lights.

About this episode

"Halloween II" was made in 2001, almost a full year after "Halloween I," but continues just moments after the end of "Nakita's Pocket Pita," answering the question of how a sitcom would even continue after the world explodes. It is the last episode to feature Ted Phillips as a writer.

"Halloween II" continues its homage to The Simpsons "Treehouse of Horror" episodes, and takes a moment to criticize some horror copouts such as "it was all a dream." Prescient in its exploration of the diverse-casting debate almost 2 decades before it began in earnest, this episode features the most diverse cast compared to prior episodes, notably casting a seven-year-old girl to play a fifty-year-old man. And viewer beware: "Halloween II" even tries its hand at parodying Bongomon by attempting to take long distance travel without jump cuts to a new extreme (analysis pending).

The episode concludes with a "Nakita Quickie," which like previous "Bongo Quickies" is not an original work; it was copied from a sample project that was included with the 3D Movie Maker program.

Some small changes have been made to the episode to improve audio audibility, text legibility, and to correct timing issues. Additional rotoscoping was performed to enhance believability of some scenes. The original ending credits sequence has been replaced with one that is more readable, but still uses the out-takes from the original.

Cars for Sale! Cars for Sale! in Halloween #1

  • Publisher Ted
  • Date published
Nakita has opened an unused car dealership, and the fief is at it again!

While the second episode of The Adventures of Bongo and Nakita seems to start off like a normal day like any other in Chinatown, we can't forget that the episode's title is "Halloween I."

TV-G: AL, MV

About this episode

The first two segments, "Car Crash" and "Ghost" were originally made in 1998 using 3D Movie Maker trial version and remade in fall 2000 with some scenes added. The third segment "Nakita's Pocket Pita," a name Ted Phillips insisted upon, was created specially for the 2000 release, although as a parody of previous installments and trial version movies, as it followed the 1998 shorts' 3D Movie Maker trial version limitation regarding character models to an extreme.

"Halloween I" pays homage to The Simpsons "Treehouse of Horror" episodes, by similarly using a creepy font for credit sequences, as well as giving most cast and crew horror-themed pseudonyms.

The episode is also notable for introducing the iconic song "Cars for Sale," and for including the only extant footage of the 1999 remake of 1998's Skelly 2, which was called simply Skelly.

Some small changes have been made to the episode to improve audio audibility and text legibility and to correct timing issues. The original credits sequence has been replaced with one that is more readable, and the final minute or so of the episode has been intercut with it to improve pacing.

Series Premiere: The Adventures of Bongo and Nakita

  • Publisher Ted
  • Date published
  • Last update by Ted
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The year is 1998. Bongo and his twin brother Ed are security guards in Chinatown.

The series premiere of The Adventures of Bongo and Nakita, originally made in 1998, remade and extended in 2000-2001, and remastered in 2022, features segments "Guard???" and "The Fief!".

TV-Y7: MV


Tune in every other Monday for more adventures of Bongo and Nakita!

About this episode

Dannick Studios first made "Guard???" in 1998 using the trial version of Microsoft 3D Movie Maker. One limitation of the trial version was only being able to choose from 2 possible actors: Bongo or Nakita (and a small number of costume choices). Another limitation: the inability to save your movie. As a result, this segment was remade and rescreened multiple times over several months until Dannick Studios finally obtained a full copy of 3D Movie Maker.

In September 2001, the premiere was extended with "Bongo Quickie" segments, an homage to the "Garfield Quickie" segments in the animated series Garfield and Friends, which Nick and Teddy Phillips frequently watched in the mid to late 1990s. However, neither "Bongo Quickie" segment is an original work; both are copied from sample projects that were included with the 3D Movie Maker program.

At the behest of a dedicated cult following, the 3D Movie Maker source code, including the sample code, was finally released by Microsoft as open source in 2022, eliminating any lingering questions about licensing for movies created with the program, and enabling us to release this episode largely uncut.

Because 3D Movie Maker was designed for use under Windows 95 and didn't actually output video files, generations of hardware and operating system changes have meant that movies created on old systems tend to play differently on newer systems. Apart from upscaling, smoothing the choppy 6 frames-per-second animation, and attempting to clean up the heavily compressed dialogue, some small changes were made to the episode to correct timing issues, which may or may not have existed originally, and to improve text legibility. The original credits sequence has been removed in favor of one that is actually readable.

Ni-Ki-Oh! 20th Anniversary

  • Publisher Ted
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  • Last update by Ted
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Twenty years ago this past week - at 2 PM on Saturday, August 17, 2002 - the first ever episode of Ni-Ki-Oh! aired. The series combined documentary and fictional scripted and retroscripted content, as we followed a boy named Niki participating in a real local Duel Monsters card tournament, where most other participants had also taken on personae inspired by characters from the Yu-Gi-Oh! anime. Beginning with this tournament, for a time, Ni-Ki-Oh! was a way of life for all involved.

Ni-Ki-Oh! ran for over 2 seasons from 2002-2004, oscillating between being a parody of Yu-Gi-Oh! and forging its own path. With the first season's airing, the world only began to see the height of the Ni-Ki-Oh! craze, with the appearance of various spinoffs, promotional TV spots, brands allegedly "sponsoring" the show, music videos, and people clamoring for a chance at a guest appearance.

Ni-Ki-Oh! entered hiatus during the middle of the 3rd season and never returned, despite never being officially cancelled, suffering from principal scheduling conflicts, as well as problems in post-production. In all, 22 episodes aired in special screenings, although photography for 28 was nearly completed, with 7 more having been scripted -- well short of the 98 episodes that had been outlined. 4 specials aired in various venues, and countless other features and featurettes, such as cast interviews and vanity Duel Monsters cards, were made available through Ni-Ki-Oh! DVDs.

Over the years, many episodes have received multiple versions. Most notorious of these versions was of the first season, whose VHS master was lost, leading to completely different edits for the aptly named DVD release of Ni-Ki-Oh! The Lost Episodes in 2004. The original season was presumed lost until it was rediscovered again in 2022.

In celebration of Ni-Ki-Oh!'s 20th birthday, we will be releasing high-definition anniversary remasters of the beloved series Saturdays after 2 PM. Famously, series cast member Joseph Justus joked in an interview that Ni-Ki-Oh! had "like no special effects." For the anniversary editions, all episodes have been re-edited as they were first imagined -- no longer constrained by budgetary or technological limitations -- using AI, improved sound design, and modern visual effects. But when appropriate, we will also be releasing remasters of the previous edits as well, for a comparison of how the series has evolved over time.

Today, we unveil the 20th anniversary edition of season 1 episode 1, entitled "No One to Duel." Creators frequently described that this episode was shot as an equipment test for a then days-old 8mm video camera, and that the show was only conceived for series after the fact. As such, this episode contains sequences using a variety of in-camera effects, as well as long durations of out-of-focus footage.

Finally, we would be remiss if we did not pay respect to the creator of the Yu-Gi-Oh! story, Kazuki Takahashi, who sadly passed away this summer at the age of 60. His work was our inspiration, and he will always hold a special place in our hearts.

TV-14: MV
Seizure warning! This program contains flashing lights.

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